Interviews

Street Art and Going Solo: An Interview with Hugh Madden

Hugh Madden is a comic creator and street artist. His work includes The Duck and the Duchess and Madame Moustache, as well as commissioned art around the streets of Dublin.
You work alone on your comics; is this a conscious choice, or are you just waiting for the right collaborator? 
I work alone mainly because I started out knowing nobody who wrote/drew comics so I had no-one to collaborate with. And over the years, I’ve developed a way of writing and drawing that is very interlinked and also completely allover the place and nothing (including dialogue, plot, faces) is finalised until I’ve inked it. And even then I’ve tippexed out entire panels and thrown out pages. I like the freedom to be able to change everything around on a whim and I could only imagine how frustrating it would be to work with someone like me. I like the IDEA of collaborating with someone (Goscinny and Uderzo always made it look good! (see attached)) but I suspect it wouldn’t work and we’d both end up frustrated.
How do you decide which ideas to work with if you’re working solo?
Usually it takes me a day or two of playing around to figure out whether an idea is just a flash in the pan or if I can make something out of it. It’s usually starts off something like “What if A did X?” and then I work out who A is, what A looks like, the style I want to draw A in, what is X? All those things can fluctuate wildly. Depending on the character I’d do research on how they dress, where they’d live, develop other characters for them to interact with, work out who is in A’s way, are they a simple villain or more complex? And often the idea will just fall flat. Sometimes it’s because the plot won’t work, or the setting is wrong, or the characters don’t connect with the plot once they have been developed or much more likely it’s just something derivative and it takes you a while to realise that. When that happens I just put them away, hoping that someday the right plot for the characters will come along or vice versa.
But even when everything seems fine in my head, when the characters, plot etc meld perfectly, it can end up going off the rails. Sometimes the characters develop on the page differently from how you thought they would and then you are no longer able to corral them along to the ending. Other times you just get stuck and can’t figure out how to get from page 5 to page 7. When that happens, I just put it aside for a few days in the hope of being able to look at it with fresh eyes.
But the best test is always when I ask myself, are you interested enough in these ideas/characters to waste time making this comic? And if the answer is yes, then I go for it!!​

What’s your production process like? Do you script the whole book first, or do you make it up as you go along?
As I’ve said, my production process is a mess. I generally know how and where the book is going to end but if the book evolves I’m not wedded to it. Often the biggest hurdle is figuring out how the comic starts. I generally squash character design, page lay out, thumbnails and script onto the one page, so one page of dialogue can be scattered over several pages of doodles. I usually go back and number the dialogue so that I know what panel I want it to be in but that is more of a guideline. Anything can change on the page. Normally I have a solid idea and layout concept in my head for 4-5 pages at a time and by the time I’ve finished pencilling those pages, I know what to do with the next batch of 4-5 pages.  I don’t wait until I’ve finished pencilling the comic to ink a page. I usually start inking early once I am convinced that the page is ready. (And partially so that I stop worrying about whether it will ever be ready)
Your art has popped up along the streets of Dublin; how did that come about? Do you think it’s beneficial to experiment with art like that? 
This is part of the Dublin Canvas project (www.dublincanvas.com) I saw a poster in relation to it when the project was still in its beta testing stage and kept an eye out until it was looking for more submissions. I applied and one of my submissions got chosen and I have applied every year since. Both my comics and my street art tie in to Irish history and folklore and I think that working on a different scale and with different tools keeps me from getting bored in one medium. And I always find that experimenting sparks inspiration.
You’ve been getting involved in the Irish comic scene more and more; have you faced any barriers to entry? 
The only difficulty I had with getting into the comic scene here is finding out about it. Often the only way I hear about an event/market/festival is when I am told about it by people at a different event/market/festival. The actual applications are usually straightforward it’s the finding out that is difficult.When young people stop by my stall and talk about how they want to get into comics, I  tell them about the different events I attend and how they can apply for them too and they often seem surprised at how easy it is to get a table.

How have you found the process of finding an audience for your work? 
Finding an audience is without doubt one of the more difficult parts of comics and always the thing I think about after I’ve made the comic (ie too late!) I’m always struggling to find an audience but I think/hope that if the art is good enough the audience will eventually find you. It’s important to keep putting your stuff out there on facebook/instagram/twitter where ever you can but going to markets etc is a really good way to find out who your audience is. Because you will always be surprised at who makes a real connection with your comics and it feels great when they do. But I have about 100 followers on twitter so take all my advice with a LARGE grain of salt!!
What’s your one tip for people wanting to make a start in comics? 
Just do it. Don’t hang around waiting for the right day or the right pen or the right atmosphere. Just sit down and force it out of you. Make it short and self contained but do it! Because your first comic is not going to be good. I know that mine wasn’t! And the sooner you finish your bad first comic, you can do your better second comic and your even better third comic and so on and so on.  You won’t get better sitting on your hands or day dreaming.
My second “one tip” is to sign up for a table at one of the markets because that way you have a deadline to get your comic finished by and there is no greater inspiration than the knowledge that you need to make something/anything!! to put on your table!
What’s next for you in the world of comics? 
What’s next for me is to finish inking my second “Madame Moustache” comic, I have a children’s comic about Vikings that I have to finish and I have about 30+ pages of a graphic novel I would like to continue. And of course I have that drawer full of unfulfilled characters and unfinished plots  to get through!
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Reviews

Review: Swift

With Thought Bubble’s comic convention on its way this weekend, Aaron Fever (Ship WreckedFrozen WasteArtos) is launching Swift, the latest interpretation of the superhero genre from an Irish writer. The creative team involved gathers a lot of experience and talent in one issue, with line art by George Kambadais, colours by Rebecca Nalty, letters by Hassan Ostmane-Elhaou, and Declan Shalvey as Editor. I was fortunate enough to get a digital copy sent to me by Fever for the sake of this review.

Swift is a classic coming of age story, about a wheelchair bound teenager waking up on the sixteenth birthday to discover he has a superpower, and needing to figure out his place in the world with this sudden change. (That’s all you get out of me on that; aside from a no-spoiler policy, I’m not here to summarise the book for you!)

Compared to other superhero books by small press creators, it makes a delightful change. We’re not given a world-saving hero in Swift, but a real, human boy who just wants to paint. We’re not given a star athlete turned Superman-knock-off, or a team of eclectic Irishness in spandez. Fever uses the genre to tell a story about how a boy finds his place in his family, and in the world.

Kambadais and Nalty perform excellently together, giving us a charming family tale with the spark of Marketing Buzz that the heroes of Swift seem to demand. There’s a lot of movement throughout the comic, with the feel of a montage rippling through the pages, loud splashes of colour making up for the silence of paper (or the whirr of my laptop fan.) With the additional of Ostmane-Elhaou’s letters, the comic guides us through one of the more difficult times in a person’s life (growing up; not all of us go through superhero training at the age of sixteen) with all the excitement of possibility, and the dread of change, blended in a way only comics can achieve.

I adored this book. There are no other words for it. Perhaps it’s the superhero fan in me, or the Young-Adult-obsessed reader that’s yet to give up on the classic coming-of-age narrative, but I didn’t want to stop reading the book once I’d started, and wanted to go back and read it again once I’d finished. It doesn’t bury itself in unnecessary complexity; Swift is an honest story, packed with wit and humour. If you’re fortunate enough to get to Thought Bubble this weekend, this is one for your shopping list.

Article

#ComicsAtDCC 2017

The biggest weekend for Irish comics is here: Dublin Comic Con. Thanks to Declan Shalvey, the hashtag #ComicsAtDCC began on Twitter, making the job of easily identifying what’ll be available that little bit easier. I’ve gathered a bunch of titles here from what I know about and what I could pick up info about online.

All Ages Comics

Going by my own experiences attending Dublin Comic Con in the past, the All-Ages titles are few and far between. I’ve collected the few that I know about here, to make things easier for readers with kids to find something age-appropriate for them.

Fate by Anthea West. Click here for our review.
Freya, Written by Tracy Sayers, Art by Trisha O’Reilly
Wren #13, Written by Paul Carroll and Jason Browne, Art by Jason Browne, Lettered by Phil Roe
Rabbit and Paul Cover
Rabbit and Paul, by Seán Hogan. Click here for our review.

Small Press

The remainder of the Irish small press, as far as I know, is not quite as suitable for children as the above comics. While some titles may be – it’s a judgement call by parents – there are some that might traumatise kids.

The Guards
The Guards, Written by Shane Ormond, Art by Kevin Keane
Chuck, Written by Paul Carroll, Art by Conor Carroll
100-times-cover
100 Times, by Katie Fleming Deluxe Edition launches at Dublin Comic Con with additional material. Click here for our original review.
Brain Fetish Cover
Brain Fetish by Kinga Korska. Click here for our review.
Carrie & Rufus, by Ben Hennessy
The Broker, Written by Wayne Talbot. Massive creative team listed in review
Will Sinister, Written by Hugo Boylan, Art by John Quigley. Check out our review here.
Clone, by Hugo Boylan, Tara Ferguson, Rebecca Reynolds and Kerrie Smith. Check out our review here.
Hoda Machine, by Leeann Hamilton
Red Sands, Written by Ciaran Marcantonio, Art by Cormac Hughes, Colours by Triona Farrell
How to Live With Your Cat, Written by Paul Carroll, Art by Gareth Luby
Meouch, Written by Paul Carroll, Art by Gareth Luby
The Waves That Breaks, by Aaron Lotsy
Frozen Waste, Written by Aaron Fever, Art by Clare Foley
The Fort Night Comic Project, Written by Dave Hendrick, Art by Peter Marry, Colours by Dee Cunniffe
solstice-1-winter-cover
Solstice, Written by Danny McLaughlin, Art by Nathan Donnell. Books 3 launches at Dublin Comic Con. (As far as we are aware!)
project-crossroads-cover
Project Crossroads, Art by Seán Hogan, Stories by Hugo Boylan, JP Jordan and Adlai McCook, Colours by Stephanie Reville and Dearbhla Kelly, Letters by Kerrie Smith, Flats by Louise Fitzpatrick. Check out our review here.
Solo-Q by Jeklly Draws

Special Mentions

Sometimes, writers and artists work on things that aren’t comics. Launching at DCC, or just released this year, are:

Maelstrom, by Paddy Lennon – Book 3 of the Flare Series
A Little Book of the Coen Brothers, a Sketchbook by Brian Burke

A Death in the Family, by Paul Carroll, launched at K-Con earlier this year

Guests

As well as all of that, attendees will also be treated to the presence of a few of Ireland’s greatest comic creators, including Will Sliney, Declan Shalvey, Stephen Mooney, John Cullen, Triona Farrell, and Robert Carey. Anthea West and Leeann Hamilton, whose books can be seen in the list above, are also on the billing.

It’s going to be a busy weekend. There’s a lot to look at it, so many books worth reading, and so many artists and other creators whose work cries out to be picked up.

I’ll be in attendance as a vendor this year, but I had the utmost pleasure of getting to review a lot of the upcoming books for this year’s event. For those who don’t know, I’m Paul Carroll – just breaking into comics, hence the plethora of new books. Because Comix Ireland is a one-man show, you won’t find reviews of anything (or by anyone) I’m involved in (with) here, which includes anything by Gareth Luby, Tracy Sayers, or Jason Browne of Buttonpress. There’s objectivity, and then there’s bias, and the line gets a little bit finer the closer you get to a book. As for every other book on the list, you’ll likely see reviews popping up ahead of other events. I personally can’t wait to see what these amazing creators, and the ones who aren’t on this list, have to offer in the years to come.

Reviews

Review: Fate

One of Ireland’s longest running web comics is taking its first three chapters and going into print. Fate, by Anthea West, is launching with a collected volume of its first three chapters (and an exclusive print-only prologue!) at Dublin Comic Con this year. The book comes with cover colours by Triona Farrell, a map by Katie O’Meara, and additional colours by O’Meara and Rebecca Nalty. Following an incredibly successful Kickstarter earlier this year, West is ready to bring her beloved back to the convention floor.

Fate is an all-ages comic that combines West’s great sense of humour with a fun and vibrant adventure story. Following the misfortune’s of the only talking dustbunny – later named by another character as ‘Bunny’ – Fate builds up a large, fantastical world with each twist and turn. In a world populated by humans, fauns, dustbunnies, mermaids and demons – and probably a whole lot more – there’s a lot to be discovered with every turn of the page and addition to the site.

West’s sense of humour and style of illustration are perfect for her intended audience, painting a colourful story world filled with friendly and easy-on-the-eye protagonists, and menacing beasts with their eyes (and stomachs) settled on hunting down Bunny. With her art loaning itself equally well to its adorable protagonist and all the nastiness that aims to devour him, readers are in for a visual delight.

The book is certainly a lot less serious than most of the other titles released by Irish creators, but that doesn’t stop it dealing with themes of friendship, prejudice, and finding courage as an unwilling hero. While it’s still quite early in the tale, there’s a lot to uncover within the story about the world, its people, and the things that bind them together. Definitely one to check out, especially if you’re looking for something child-friendly from the Irish small press creators.

Check out Anthea on Twitter at: @antheawest

 

Article

Photos from DECAF, April 23 2017

On April 23rd, we saw the first Dublin Eight Comic Arts Festival: DECAF. Organised by Dublin Comic Arts with panels by The Comics Lab, the event saw to showcase some of the amazing comic art in Dublin with a market, panels, and a few familiar elements from The Comics Lab that were a welcome sight for those who arrived with kids. More on that later.

Entering the Fumbally Stables, attendees were greeted by Matthew Melis and Debbie Jenkinson, two of the organisers for the day. Matthew put together the market side of things, while Debbie arranged the panels. She was also responsible for the massive selection of comics for sale on the way in, from her, Sarah Bowie, Matthew, Paddy Lynch, Philip Barrett and more.

Julie Nick and Katie Fleming sat the first table as attendees entered the main market room (and we the first to be accosted for a photo!) Julie brands herself as a cartoonist, with a sketchbook and Pulp Stories Vol. 1 to show off (along with an amazing new print!). Katie, on the other hand, is a full-on comic creator, as artist for Helion and creator of 100 Times and 100 More Times (NB: gay werewolves) under her belt (along with a ton of prints!)

Nikki Foster and Hugh Madden were next in line. Nikki had a range of zines of varying sizes with her, which helped to showcase the variety of styles available in the Irish comics scene. Hugh had a range of strange tales featuring anthropomorphised animals – obviously I had to get my hands on them.

Pushing the limits of awesome strangeness were All Things Thom and Miriam Rodriguez. Thom had possibly the widest range of things with her, from t-shirts to stickers, prints and zines – including The Thom Guide to: What To Say When You Don’t Know What to Say, which she says she’s used at parties. Miriam had a range of Spanish-language comics with her, including one that had she censored on a second printing – roughly translating as ‘things that are a pain in the ass’, and featuring said pained-ass on the cover.

Seán Hogan and Dylan Drennan extended the diversity of Irish comics available on the day at the next table down. Seán brought Project Crossroads and Rabbit and Paul with him, respectively a sci-fi-fantasy-horror anthology and all-ages comics about a boy from Bally’O’Jhaysus who buys an anthropomorphised rabbit. (Try saying that with your mouth full!) Dylan, AKA Skabag, had Gayboy with him, a fun collection of artwork from someone who’s only just entering the scene with a book.

Next in line were Clare Foley and Karen Harte. Clare is a traditional artist, creating her books in watercolours, and accidentally reminding people that she can draw hands really well. (We joked about this on the day. It was probably funnier then.) Karen is one of the editors and organisers of the MINE Anthology, a collection of artwork and comics about and in aid of the Repeal the 8th/Abortion Rights Campaign.

At the end of the row were Sarah Bowie and Luke Healy, joined here by Charlot Kristensen who designed the poster for the event. Sarah is one of the organisers of The Comics Lab, and had with a wide range of comics and zines, including one about how she’s not related to David Bowie. Luke had a huge collection of comics of varying prices and sizes, showing off a multitude of stories and skills.

As well as having a market on the day, DECAF also provided an opportunity for people to tune in to two panels; Karen Harte led one, about activism and comics – following the successful publication of MINE, joined by three of the contributors to the book. She was followed by Luke Healy, Clare Foley, Katie Fleming and Olly Blake (pictured above) as they spoke about their inspirations in comics, and what they’re working on now.

As well as panels, the Comic Labs also brought along drawing exercises for adults and kids alike, which took the burden of entertainment off some parents for a few minutes.

Attendees were also encouraged to partake in the Comic Swap, where books could be traded or bought from the table, based on what people brought with them.

The event was also catered by Kev’s Kitchen, providing hot, cold and baked foods, along with a range of drinks.

All in all, it made for a fun day, and only the first for Dublin Comic Arts. They’ll be returning on July 23rd, this time at the Dublin Food Co-op in Newmarket Square. If it’s anything like the weekend’s event, it’ll be one to spend a day at.

phantom
Article

New Releases at Dublin Comic Con

In less than two weeks, the doors to the Convention Centre in Dublin will open for Dublin Comic Con. Now in its fourth year, DCC has become the go-to event for guests, activities and new releases in the Irish comic book scene. This year is no exception, with a long list of guests from across pop culture and the comic book scene. By my count and a quick search on Twitter and Facebook, we’re looking at (at least) sixteen releases in August. (Or, if you quantify in Internet terms, ALL THE MONEY!)

New from Lightning Strike Comic Books

The forerunners in the ‘Release Everything at DCC’ trend are Lightning Strike Comic Books, run by local boy Eoin McAuley. Confirmed releases include:

  • Fanastical Sombrero (LS’s first children’s title)
  • The Phantom 80th Anniversary comic
  • A Clockwork Universe
  • Double Dead (available in print for the first time)
  • Speakeasy
  • A preview of None Shall Pass

You can also find their anthology comics on their table.

phantom

New from Buttonpress Publications

Buttonpress, publishers of several all-ages Irish superhero comics, are proud to announce their fourth title for Dublin Comic Con: Stoat. They’ll also have their other titles – Wren, Artos, and Thimble.

stoat

New from Anthea West

Anthea, writer and artist behind Fate and The Earthbound God, is bringing a new type of comic to Dublin Comic Con: a horror anthology.

Sleep Tight adds to Anthea’s collection of amazing titles, and isn’t one to be missed.

Sleep Tight

New from Paul Bolger

Paul Bolger, celebrated creator of Hound, is bringing with him two new books to DCC.

  • Hound 2: Defender
  • Inktober 2015 Sketchbook

Fans of Hound – a retelling of the story of Cú Chulainn – and Paul’s art will be happy with these announcements. Keep in mind, Hound books are published in hardback, and so will cost more than the other new releases. Book 1 sells for €25. Keep that in mind when drawing up your budget for the weekend.

Hound Book 2

New from NP Press

Cork-based publisher, NP Press, are releasing The Guards at Dublin Comic Con. A paranormal detective story from a new press, it’s not one to be missed.

The Guards

New from Cremona Publishing

Creators of the Celtic Knights, Cremona Publishing are bringing their latest title, Junker the Stinky Knight, to DCC. You can check it out along with more of their books at their table.

Junker

New from Flare

Flare, a book series by Paddy Lennon, is getting a one-shot comic at Dublin Comic Con. The novels will, presumably, also be available from Lennon over the weekend.

Flare

“3” and New Artbooks

Without any images to work with, you’ll have to settle for my unbridled excitement for new releases when it comes to these new books.

  • 3, a new comic from Dave Hendrick (writer of Granuaile Queen of Storms from O’Brien Press)
  • Scratched Metal, a new artbook from Art of Helixel
  • A new artbook from Tríona ‘Tree’ Farrell

I wish I could show some of what you’re in store for from these three, but unfortunately Hendricks has only released one image from within the book, and cover-images haven’t been released by Helixel or Tree. Artbooks are a nice piece to pick up at any convention, providing a good chance to explore an artist’s work outside of a story (particularly if you like someone’s art but aren’t sure of the story that the book’s writer has come up with.)

Anything else?

I don’t expect to have found every new release for DCC. Nor is this list a complete collection of everything you can find at Dublin Comic Con in August. If you’re releasing something, or know of something new coming to DCC, let us know! We’ll update this listing and post about it on Facebook and Twitter.

Web Series

Commerce | CO/MIX Episode 4

It’s all fun and games until there’s money to be made. The business of comic books takes some probing to fully understand, and a summer’s worth of conventions to understand. From the point of view of independent artists, small publishers, and one of Ireland’s leading mainstream book publishers, the business of comic books is full of competition, statistical awareness, and the need to fit into the plans of Ireland’s retailers.

Robert Glick / ComicBooks.ie (featured)
Robert Glick is an American comic book broker and grader, living in Ireland. He operates ComicBooks.ie, and runs the monthly Geek-Mart event.
http://www.comicbooks.ie/

Will Sliney
Will Sliney is a Cork based artist currently working on Marvel Comics’ ‘Spider¬Man 2099’ with Peter David. He has previously worked on ‘Fearless Defenders’ (Marvel) and ‘Star Wars: The Clone Wars’ (Egmont/Titan). He published his debut graphic novel, ‘Celtic Warrior’, with The O’Brien Press in 2013.
http://sliney.blogspot.ie/

Emma Byrne / O’Brien Press
Emma is a graphic designer and illustrator working within The O’Brien Press as Design Manager and Art Director. She designs the covers for the company’s books, and works with the writers and artists of the company’s graphic novels.
http://www.obrien.ie/emma-byrne

Eoin McAuley / Lightning Strike
Eoin is the owner and publisher of Lightning Strike Comic Books, one of Ireland’s leading independent publishers. Based in Dublin, they produce an anthology comic book, ‘Lightning Strike Presents’, among a growing range of titles, including ‘Afterworld’ and ‘The Life and Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ (with Dublin Comic Con).
http://lscomics.com/

Paddy Lynch / Cardboard Press
Paddy is an illustrator and sequential artist based in Dublin. He hosts the Dublin Comic Jam, and co¬founded the Comic Labs. He illustrated ‘Big Jim’ (The O’Brien Press) and is co-¬owner of The Cardboard Press.
http://www.patrickl.net/

Anthea West
Anthea is a sequential artist and cartoonist from Dublin. Her debut graphic novel, ‘The Earthbound God’, was published in 2013. She is currently producing ‘Fate’.
http://dustbunny-studios.com/

Triona ‘Tree’ Farrell
Tree is a sequential artist and freelance illustrator from Dublin. She is a former member of the Superhero Help Desk, and has produced two comic books; ‘Swords & Sisters’, and ‘Azure Capricorn’.
http://treedesigns.portfoliobox.me/
CO/MIX was produced as part of the M.Sc. in Multimedia in DCU, 2014-2015, by Matthew Ashe, Paul Carroll, Darragh O’Riordan, and Ciarán Byrne.

Matt: Matt is a Fine Art graduate from IADT, experienced in video exhibitions, visual effects and 3D animation. He worked as Director of CO/MIX. He runs The VR Agency as its lead producer and editor.
https://ie.linkedin.com/pub/matthew-ashe/70/769/970
http://www.thevragency.co/

Paul: Paul is an English graduate from Mater Dei, and a freelance writer and multimedia producer. He worked as Producer of CO/MIX. He runs Comix Ireland, and assists in the organisation of the Geek-Mart.
https://ie.linkedin.com/in/paulcarroll1
http://paulcarrollwriter.com
http://comixireland.com

Darragh: Darragh is a Marketing graduate from DIT, and worked as web developer in Javascript on the CO/MIX project.
https://ie.linkedin.com/in/darragh11

Ciarán: Ciarán is an experienced graphic designer and sound designer. He led the sound engineering and graphic elements of CO/MIX.
https://ie.linkedin.com/in/mrciaranbyrne
http://soundcloud.com/adeyhawke

Web Series

Community | CO/MIX Episode 3

From the outside, the comic book community looks like one big, happy family. A closer look reveals the relationships between the various sub­-communities in Ireland, the nature of the people involved in bringing together the comic book community as a whole, and explores the notion of just how different the Irish comic book scene is to its American counterparts. From drink­-and-­draws at a local pub, to large­scale conventions across the country, to a small port village in Cork, the community in Ireland is spread far and wide.

Paddy Lynch / Cardboard Press / Dublin Comic Jam / Stray Lines

Paddy is an illustrator and sequential artist based in Dublin. He hosts the Dublin Comic Jam, and co­founded the Comic Labs. He illustrated ‘Big Jim’ (The O’Brien Press) and is co-­owner of The Cardboard Press.

http://www.patrickl.net/

Anthea West

Anthea is a sequential artist and cartoonist from Dublin. Her debut graphic novel, ‘The Earthbound God’, was published in 2013. She is currently producing ‘Fate’.

http://dustbunny-studios.com/

Triona ‘Tree’ Farrell

Tree is a sequential artist and freelance illustrator from Dublin. She is a former member of the Superhero Help Desk, and has produced two comic books; ‘Swords & Sisters’, and ‘Azure Capricorn’.

http://treedesigns.portfoliobox.me/

Stephen Lynch & Tina Branigan

Stephen, AKA Widdle Wade, is a voice­-actor by trade, as well as costume and prop­-maker. A regular to the convention scene in Ireland, he is also a member of the Emerald Garrison. Tina, AKA Cyanide Kisses, is an alternative model and cosplayer, and coordinator of volunteers at Dublin Comic Con.

https://www.facebook.com/WadesWiddleWorkshop

https://www.facebook.com/CyanideKissesCosplay

Will Sliney

Will Sliney is a Cork based artist currently working on Marvel Comics’ ‘Spider­Man 2099’ with Peter David. He has previously worked on ‘Fearless Defenders’ (Marvel) and ‘Star Wars: The Clone Wars’ (Egmont/Titan). He published his debut graphic novel, ‘Celtic Warrior’, with The O’Brien Press in 2013.

http://sliney.blogspot.ie/

 

CO/MIX was produced as part of the M.Sc. in Multimedia in DCU, 2014-2015, by Matthew Ashe, Paul Carroll, Darragh O’Riordan, and Ciarán Byrne.

Matt: Matt is a Fine Art graduate from IADT, experienced in video exhibitions, visual effects and 3D animation. He worked as Director of CO/MIX. He runs The VR Agency as its lead producer and editor.

https://ie.linkedin.com/pub/matthew-ashe/70/769/970

http://www.thevragency.co/

Paul: Paul is an English graduate from Mater Dei, and a freelance writer and multimedia producer. He worked as Producer of CO/MIX. He runs Comix Ireland, and assists in the organisation of the Geek-Mart.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/paulcarroll1

http://paulcarrollwriter.com

http://comixireland.com

Darragh: Darragh is a Marketing graduate from DIT, and worked as web developer in Javascript on the CO/MIX project.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/darragh11

Ciarán: Ciarán is an experienced graphic designer and sound designer. He led the sound engineering and graphic elements of CO/MIX.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/mrciaranbyrne

http://soundcloud.com/adeyhawke

Web Series

Connection | CO/MIX Episode 2

Comic book relationships are a thing of wonder, especially in the increasingly complicated universe produced by Marvel Comics and DC, but just how much do these romantic notions compare with the reality of the readers’ lives? A look into the lives of three couples on the convention scene reveals how deep a connection can be made, and how much that connection plays a toll on the lives of those involved.

Stephen Lynch & Tina Branigan

Stephen, AKA Widdle Wade, is a voice­-actor by trade, as well as costume and prop­-maker. A regular to the convention scene in Ireland, he is also a member of the Emerald Garrison. Tina, AKA Cyanide Kisses, is an alternative model and cosplayer, and coordinator of volunteers at Dublin Comic Con.

https://www.facebook.com/WadesWiddleWorkshop

https://www.facebook.com/CyanideKissesCosplay

 

Ryan Wade & Danielle Smyth

Ryan and Danielle met as Belfast Batman and Carrick Batman, with multiple cosplays to their names. The couple work the streets of Belfast as real-­life superheroes, helping the poor and the homeless. Cosplay led to their engagement.

https://www.facebook.com/The-Wade-Show-1610223062629011/

https://www.facebook.com/Belfast-Wonder-Woman-319702121479356/

 

Paul Raven & Louise Higgins

Paul and ­Louise are a cosplay couple, attending conventions as the Joker and Harley, and as Daredevil and Elektra.

 

CO/MIX was produced as part of the M.Sc. in Multimedia in DCU, 2014-2015, by Matthew Ashe, Paul Carroll, Darragh O’Riordan, and Ciarán Byrne.

Matt: Matt is a Fine Art graduate from IADT, experienced in video exhibitions, visual effects and 3D animation. He worked as Director of CO/MIX. He runs The VR Agency as its lead producer and editor.

https://ie.linkedin.com/pub/matthew-ashe/70/769/970

http://www.thevragency.co/

Paul: Paul is an English graduate from Mater Dei, and a freelance writer and multimedia producer. He worked as Producer of CO/MIX. He runs Comix Ireland, and assists in the organisation of the Geek-Mart.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/paulcarroll1

http://paulcarrollwriter.com

http://comixireland.com

Darragh: Darragh is a Marketing graduate from DIT, and worked as web developer in Javascript on the CO/MIX project.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/darragh11

Ciarán: Ciarán is an experienced graphic designer and sound designer. He led the sound engineering and graphic elements of CO/MIX.

https://ie.linkedin.com/in/mrciaranbyrne

http://soundcloud.com/adeyhawke